Book Review: The Art of Clean Up

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Do you love it when things are organized neatly?

Are you a fan of art, design, and humor?

I thought I’d mix things up a bit this April Fool’s Day by reviewing the aptly named book, The Art of Clean Up: Life Made Neat and Tidy (2013, Chronicle Books), by Ursus Wehrli.

Before we begin, I’d like to thank H.S. for inspiring me to do this book review.

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Some links in this post may be Amazon.com affiliate links, which means I may receive a commission from Amazon.com, at no cost to you, if you make a purchase using one of those links. I only recommend products and services that I know or trust to be of high quality, whether an affiliate relationship is in place or not.

 

Book Review: The Art of Clean Up

The Art of Clean Up: Life Made Neat and Tidy (2013, Chronicle Books) may be only 48 pages in length, but it is chock full of deliciously organized scenes from everyday life.

Brainchild of Ursus Wehrli, a Swiss comedian, artist, and typographer, The Art of Clean Up brings readers into Mr. Wehrli’s world of neatly organized things.

Open up any page in the book and you’ll be treated to two different worlds: on the left hand side, different scenes from everyday life featuring various items, materials, and people; on the right hand side, the same scenes organized neatly according to Mr. Wehrli’s artistic eye.

Image of a man in a suit leaning to the right.
Ursus Wehrli, author of “The Art of Clean Up.” Photo credit: Geri Born.

I breezed through the book the first time around, as I was eager to see what all the fuss was about.

I enjoyed the cleverly organized items in the crisp, colorful, photos. Several hours later, I picked up the book, and carefully leafed through each of the pages.

The more time you spend looking at the book, the more wonderful things you’ll uncover as you compare the before and after pages to one another.

I definitely found the second reading of the book to be more entertaining than the first, as I took the time to look at and appreciate Mr. Wehrli’s method of organizing items.

I will say, the book isn’t laugh-out-loud funny, but if you are a fan of organized spaces and things, you’ll probably get a couple of light-hearted chuckles as you go through the book.

Among the types of chaotic/organized scenes you’ll find in the book: a container of french fries turned into neatly-made tally marks, a bouquet of flowers organized into its bare components, and a neatly organized bowl of fruit salad, fruit, bowl, spoon, whipped cream, and all.

Image of french fries organized neatly
The Swiss cover of “The Art of Clean Up”

The Art of Clean Up would make a great housewarming gift for someone who keeps an orderly house, a thoughtful birthday present for someone who loves all things organization, or a special gift for someone who enjoys whimsical humor. It would also make a great coffee table book, or a conversation piece for a living room, den, or office.

Interested in more order as art? Be sure to check out the entries in my Order as Art series on the blog, as well as my Order as Art board on Pinterest.

How about you? Have you come across any interesting books, magazines, or websites that celebrate the wonders of organized things? Join the conversation and leave a comment below!

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Some links in this post may be Amazon.com affiliate links, which means I may receive a commission from Amazon.com, at no cost to you, if you make a purchase using one of those links. I only recommend products and services that I know or trust to be of high quality, whether an affiliate relationship is in place or not.

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Rashelle Isip is a New York City-based professional organizer and productivity consultant who helps people get organized so they can stress less, have more fun, and be happier at home. Her work has been featured in Good Housekeeping, Fast Company, Cosmopolitan, The Washington Post, Business Insider, and The Atlantic. Get access to her free guide, 3 Smart Steps to Organizing Your Home, by clicking here.
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